The Lasting Value of the Liberal Arts


Featured article featured on evolllution.com written by our very own Dr. Evan D. Duff.

This pandemic has given the liberal arts the time and space to begin building upon and traditional models and innovating new methods to deliver the education and skills that employers are looking for…

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President Duff to Participate in Educational Panel


Join us on a Webinar learn about the impact of COVID-19 on our local education systems and find out what the next steps will be for the Fall 2020 school year. All proceeds are going to Tackle the Tar which will support our local students for scholarships at Edgecombe and Nash Community Colleges and North Carolina Wesleyan College.

Webinar Panel Featuring:
Dr. Valerie Bridges, Superintendent, Edgecombe County Public Schools
Dr. Evan Duff, President North Carolina Wesleyan College
Dr. Steve Ellis, Superintendent, Nash-Rocky Mount Public Schools
Dr. Lew Hunnicutt, President Nash Community College
Dr. Gregory McLeod, President, Edgecombe Community College

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From Homeschool Student to NCWC Alumna


ROCKY MOUNT, NORTH CAROLINA – Recent Wesleyan graduate, Abigail Wooten, began studying at Nash Community College as a dually enrolled student taking classes through their Career and College Promise program during her junior and senior years of high school.

Abigail Wooten, NC Wesleyan Spring 20′ Graduate

At NCC, Wooten was a member of the National Society of Leadership and Success and Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society. She graduated from Nash in 2018 with Associate in Arts and Associate in Science degrees, with highest honors.

Wooten said that although it can be intimidating for students to speak up when they do not understand something, it is important to do so. “If you put in the time and ask for help when you need it, you will succeed, not just at Nash, but out in the world as well.”

Following graduation from NCC, Wooten transferred to North Carolina Wesleyan College. She graduated last month with a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics and a minor in Computer Information Systems, with highest honors. “I believe Nash helped prepare me for my journey at NCWC by instilling a strong work ethic in me. By the time I got to NCWC, I had already learned how to stay on top of assignment deadlines and how to ask professors for help when I needed it, two skills I consider essential.”

While attending NCWC, Wooten worked several part-time jobs, including tutoring at NCC. “This didn’t leave much time for clubs and activities at school,” she said. “However, I transferred my membership to the local chapter of the National Society of Leadership and Success, an organization I originally joined at Nash. I was able to attend speaker events and fundraisers with them. I also volunteered for community service projects.”

Wooten currently serves as a tutor in the NCC Mathematics Department. She plans to continue working with developmental math students, providing the support for foundational learning they need to become mathematicians.

She has been accepted into East Carolina University’s Master of Arts in Mathematics program and will begin this fall. “I hope to teach math full-time at Nash. The math department was instrumental in making me and so many others into the people we are today, and I want to continue that tradition.”

Through the Career & College Promise program, qualified high-school-age students have the opportunity to begin their college education, tuition free. Interested students should meet with their high school counselor or home school principal. Enrollment is open for NCC’s online summer classes. Summer semester begins May 26. For more information, visit nashcc.edu/registration or call 252.451.8235.

Students who are currently enrolled in NCC’s Career & College Promise program with 12 or more credit hours and are interested in transferring to NC Wesleyan should contact Jason Letchworth, Transfer Admissions Counselor, at jletchworth@ncwc.edu for more information. Those with less than 12 credit hours can apply for regular admission at ncwc.edu/apply-for-admission and one of Wesleyan’s Admission Counselors will assist you each step of the way.

NC Wesleyan Offers Care Packages for Students


ROCKY MOUNT, NORTH CAROLINA – In an effort to assist students and support those on campus, Wesleyan provided care packages Friday, March 20 with help from local churches and organizations. Packages included snacks, drinks and other food items for students to take back to their residence halls.

NC Wesleyan currently has approximately 200 students remaining on campus to finish the semester via remote instruction. Many of these students do not have transportation or the financial means to return home. These care packages were distributed in hopes of boosting students’ spirits, while showing them love and care during this national pandemic.

Organizations who signed up to donate items, dropped them off this week in The Dunn Center’s Garner Lobby. Wesleyan staff were sure to practice social distancing and wore gloves while putting the care packages together. Students were strongly encouraged to also maintain social distancing while picking up their packages, as well as not congregating in groups of 10 or more.

The initiative was led by Director of YTI & Church Relations Mikah Brondyke. Nearly ten local organizations pitched in to help with the effort.  

“I’ve really been amazed with how many and how quickly churches pitched into show support and love to our students. It’s really been a testament to our community partnerships, specifically with local churches and other Christian organizations,” stated Brondyke. “Thank you to everyone who has reached out showing support for our NCWC students and campus during this national crisis.”

For those interested in donating additional items, please contact Mikah Brondyke at mbrondyke@ncwc.edu or 252.904.4678.

Wesleyan Collects Homemade Masks to Protect Against COVID-19


With the dwindling supplies of protective masks nationwide, NC Wesleyan is mobilizing an effort to make homemade face masks to help local providers protect against COVID-19. The College is calling on the public to help with this effort!

North Carolina Wesleyan College will be collecting masks at a drive through drop-off at the Gateway Technology Center at the front of campus on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:00 – 7:00 p.m. and on Saturdays from 9:00 a.m. – noon. The College will then distribute to local providers in need.

For more information, contact NCWC’s RN to BSN Director of Dr. Brittany Bass at bbass@ncwc.edu. For DIY mask and pattern ideas, watch the video below:

North Carolina Wesleyan Semi-Finalist in Ethics Bowl


ROCKY MOUNT, NORTH CAROLINA – The 9th Annual Ethics Bowl, a debate competition hosted by the North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities (NCICU), asks students to compete over a selected topic. Out of 22 North Carolina private colleges, North Carolina Wesleyan College placed in the semifinals.

L to R: Catherine Leake, Jarrod Kelly, Grace deMontesquiou, Chanel Patterson, NCICU President Dr. A. Hope Williams, Richard Smalls, James Cheazar and Boluwatife Johnson.

This year’s topic explored Ethics in the Agriculture. The final question asked, “What ethical responsibilities does the United States have to support the agricultural industry in securing the qualified workers that it needs?” Other questions covered topics such as genetically modified and/or gene edited food.

Of the 22 private colleges in attendance, this year’s semifinalists included: High Point University, Salem College, Belmont Abbey College and North Carolina Wesleyan College. The competition was held at the North Carolina Legislative Complex in Raleigh on February 21 and 22. The judge’s panel was composed of 60 corporate, nonprofit, legislative and community leaders.

North Carolina Wesleyan’s ethics team is led by Boluwatife Johnson, Chanel Patterson as Ethical Theory Lead. The researchers for the team include James Cheazar, Richard “RJ” Smalls, Catherine Leake and Grace deMontesquiou. Drs. Jarrod Kelly and Sherry Holland serve as faculty coordinators. With some members graduating, the team hopes to recruit new members and return next year for competition.

Faculty coordinator, Jarrod Kelly, congratulates the team, “We received many positive comments from judges, team coordinators and spectators. Our team was complimented most on their presentations,” he says. “The team really had their opening statement down to a science and it was extraordinarily impressive to observe. The team stole the spotlight with their poise, knowledge and passion.” The team had a record of 4-0 in regular level matches and had been preparing for the competition since August 2019.

Wilson Community College and North Carolina Wesleyan College Partner to Enhance College Transfer


WILSON — Wilson Community College (WCC) and North Carolina Wesleyan College (NCWC) signed a Memorandum of Understanding and University Partnership Agreement on Monday, February 24, that enables students to continue their education after earning a two-year degree. The agreement gives WCC students with Associate in Arts (AA), Associate in Science (AS), and Associate in Applied Science (AAS) degrees access to the Wesleyan Works program, which includes pre-admission advising, transfer credits, and a clear definition of the transfer of courses from WCC to NCWC. 

(L-R): Dr. Evan Duff, President of NC Wesleyan College,
Tim Wright, President of Wilson Community College

Wesleyan Works is a transfer program designed for community college students who plan to continue their education at NCWC. The program guarantees admission to NCWC for WCC’s AA, AS, and AAS graduates. WCC students who transfer under this agreement are automatically eligible for Wesleyan Works. Students will have access to academic advising and financial aid counseling through NCWC. 

WCC students who graduate and transfer under this agreement can select any of NCWC’s traditional programs of study or may enroll in NCWC’s Adult and Professional Studies programs, utilizing the advantages of the Wesleyan Works program. For example, AAS graduates may transfer up to 75 credit hours to NCWC. 

WCC Vice President for Academic Affairs Mr. Rob Holsten shared, “We are excited to continue and expand our partnership with North Carolina Wesleyan College to offer more options for students to continue their studies after completing their two-year degree here at Wilson Community College. This type of partnership furthers the College’s mission to help students reach their educational goals, and adds to existing opportunities for transferable degrees.”