Master of Science in Criminal Justice Curriculum


The Master of Science in Criminal Justice requires the completion of 33 semester hours of credit.

Required Core Courses (18 hours)

This course is designed to focus on and develop the understanding of the systemic nature of current crime control efforts in the criminal justice system. The functions, processes, and structures of the criminal justice system and the interrelationship of the system’s various components will be studied, with an emphasis on law enforcement, courts, corrections, and juvenile justice components.

An analysis and study of crime victims and the relationship between the victims, offenders, society and social media. The issues of justice and redress for victims of criminal acts will be emphasized.

This course focuses on the traditional and current criminological theories applied to criminal behavior. Application of criminological theories to case studies will be used.

The study of research methods appropriate to criminal justice research. The focus will be on evaluation and critique of research methods and findings.

A study of the current challenges that confront the criminal justice system and its personnel. Strategies for addressing these challenges will be an integral part of this course. Case studies will be included.

Demonstration of knowledge gained in the MSCJ program by completing a program analysis paper or comprehensive examination. The topic for the program analysis paper will be selected by the student, and approved by the instructor. The topic will be consistent with the student’s area of concentration and will demonstrate comprehension and the ability to apply the knowledge gained to a relevant issues or problem in the criminal justice system. The comprehensive examination will be based on the classes completed by the student and the requirements of the major. Prerequisite JUS 630 and final semester.

Electives for Criminal Justice Administration Concentration (Select 15 hours)

A study of community leadership, development, social change and organization will be presented. Effective strategies for collaborating with others in the community and various organizations to achieve social change and more effective delivery of criminal justice services and programs will be presented.

The study of management theory and laws applicable to human resource management, including government regulations, employment strategies, compensation, benefits, performance evaluation, and termination procedures.

Grant writing strategies will be studied which prepare students to pursue funding opportunities in the criminal justice field. Principles specific to governmental agencies will be presented. Included is the study of financial management principles and theories that ensure accurate and valid records, including reporting and legal responsibilities.

A study of the formal organizations which comprise the workplace in contemporary American society; specifically, the influence of organizational structure on human behavior, characteristics of various structures, conflict between individual and organization, and organizational change.

A study of foundational and contemporary theories and cutting edge research that apply to the criminal justice system. Techniques for managing and developing an efficient and effective organization are included.

Intensive study of a student selected, instructor approved topic in criminal justice.

Field experience in the criminal justice system, reserved for those students approved by the criminal justice internship coordinator. The internship will provide a broadened insight in the criminal justice system.

Electives for Criminal Justice Practice Concentration (Select 15 hours)

Grant writing strategies will be studied which prepare students to pursue funding opportunities in the criminal justice field. Principles specific to governmental agencies will be presented. Included is the study of financial management principles and theories that ensure accurate and valid records, including reporting and legal responsibilities.

A study of the formal organizations which comprise the workplace in contemporary American society; specifically, the influence of organizational structure on human behavior, characteristics of various structures, conflict between individual and organization, and organizational change.

A study of foundational and contemporary theories and cutting edge research that apply to the criminal justice system. Techniques for managing and developing an efficient and effective organization are included.

A study of current issues and the impact on society and the criminal justice system. Students develop an understanding of these issues and the challenges that they present. Strategies for addressing these issues are included.

This course will explore the interrelatedness of drugs and crime and the intervention and prevention strategies utilized by criminal justice organizations and other entities.

A study of historical and current techniques for supervising employees working with offenders and chemically dependent individuals. An integral part of this course will be role plays, case studies, and coaching sessions.

This course is designed to provide a modern perspective on issues related to race, gender and class in American society. The historical perspective will be reviewed while utilizing contemporary effective models of gender and race to demonstrate the relationship between these variables and the criminal justice system. Focus is not only on the offender, but also consideration given to personnel issues as well.

Intensive study of a student selected, instructor approved topic in criminal justice.

Field experience in the criminal justice system, reserved for those students approved by the criminal justice internship coordinator. The internship will provide a broadened insight in the criminal justice system.