From Homeschool Student to NCWC Alumna


ROCKY MOUNT, NORTH CAROLINA – Recent Wesleyan graduate, Abigail Wooten, began studying at Nash Community College as a dually enrolled student taking classes through their Career and College Promise program during her junior and senior years of high school.

Abigail Wooten, NC Wesleyan Spring 20′ Graduate

At NCC, Wooten was a member of the National Society of Leadership and Success and Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society. She graduated from Nash in 2018 with Associate in Arts and Associate in Science degrees, with highest honors.

Wooten said that although it can be intimidating for students to speak up when they do not understand something, it is important to do so. “If you put in the time and ask for help when you need it, you will succeed, not just at Nash, but out in the world as well.”

Following graduation from NCC, Wooten transferred to North Carolina Wesleyan University. She graduated last month with a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics and a minor in Computer Information Systems, with highest honors. “I believe Nash helped prepare me for my journey at NCWC by instilling a strong work ethic in me. By the time I got to NCWC, I had already learned how to stay on top of assignment deadlines and how to ask professors for help when I needed it, two skills I consider essential.”

While attending NCWC, Wooten worked several part-time jobs, including tutoring at NCC. “This didn’t leave much time for clubs and activities at school,” she said. “However, I transferred my membership to the local chapter of the National Society of Leadership and Success, an organization I originally joined at Nash. I was able to attend speaker events and fundraisers with them. I also volunteered for community service projects.”

Wooten currently serves as a tutor in the NCC Mathematics Department. She plans to continue working with developmental math students, providing the support for foundational learning they need to become mathematicians.

She has been accepted into East Carolina University’s Master of Arts in Mathematics program and will begin this fall. “I hope to teach math full-time at Nash. The math department was instrumental in making me and so many others into the people we are today, and I want to continue that tradition.”

Through the Career & College Promise program, qualified high-school-age students have the opportunity to begin their college education, tuition free. Interested students should meet with their high school counselor or home school principal. Enrollment is open for NCC’s online summer classes. Summer semester begins May 26. For more information, visit nashcc.edu/registration or call 252.451.8235.

Students who are currently enrolled in NCC’s Career & College Promise program with 12 or more credit hours and are interested in transferring to NC Wesleyan should contact Jason Letchworth, Transfer Admissions Counselor, at jletchworth@ncwc.edu for more information. Those with less than 12 credit hours can apply for regular admission at ncwc.edu/apply-for-admission and one of Wesleyan’s Admission Counselors will assist you each step of the way.

NC Wesleyan Offers Care Packages for Students


ROCKY MOUNT, NORTH CAROLINA – In an effort to assist students and support those on campus, Wesleyan provided care packages Friday, March 20 with help from local churches and organizations. Packages included snacks, drinks and other food items for students to take back to their residence halls.

NC Wesleyan currently has approximately 200 students remaining on campus to finish the semester via remote instruction. Many of these students do not have transportation or the financial means to return home. These care packages were distributed in hopes of boosting students’ spirits, while showing them love and care during this national pandemic.

Organizations who signed up to donate items, dropped them off this week in The Dunn Center’s Garner Lobby. Wesleyan staff were sure to practice social distancing and wore gloves while putting the care packages together. Students were strongly encouraged to also maintain social distancing while picking up their packages, as well as not congregating in groups of 10 or more.

The initiative was led by Director of YTI & Church Relations Mikah Brondyke. Nearly ten local organizations pitched in to help with the effort.  

“I’ve really been amazed with how many and how quickly churches pitched into show support and love to our students. It’s really been a testament to our community partnerships, specifically with local churches and other Christian organizations,” stated Brondyke. “Thank you to everyone who has reached out showing support for our NCWC students and campus during this national crisis.”

For those interested in donating additional items, please contact Mikah Brondyke at mbrondyke@ncwc.edu or 252.904.4678.

Wesleyan Collects Homemade Masks to Protect Against COVID-19


With the dwindling supplies of protective masks nationwide, NC Wesleyan is mobilizing an effort to make homemade face masks to help local providers protect against COVID-19. The College is calling on the public to help with this effort!

North Carolina Wesleyan University will be collecting masks at a drive through drop-off at the Gateway Technology Center at the front of campus on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:00 – 7:00 p.m. and on Saturdays from 9:00 a.m. – noon. The College will then distribute to local providers in need.

For more information, contact NCWC’s RN to BSN Director of Dr. Brittany Bass at bbass@ncwc.edu. For DIY mask and pattern ideas, watch the video below:

North Carolina Wesleyan Semi-Finalist in Ethics Bowl


ROCKY MOUNT, NORTH CAROLINA – The 9th Annual Ethics Bowl, a debate competition hosted by the North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities (NCICU), asks students to compete over a selected topic. Out of 22 North Carolina private colleges, North Carolina Wesleyan University placed in the semifinals.

L to R: Catherine Leake, Jarrod Kelly, Grace deMontesquiou, Chanel Patterson, NCICU President Dr. A. Hope Williams, Richard Smalls, James Cheazar and Boluwatife Johnson.

This year’s topic explored Ethics in the Agriculture. The final question asked, “What ethical responsibilities does the United States have to support the agricultural industry in securing the qualified workers that it needs?” Other questions covered topics such as genetically modified and/or gene edited food.

Of the 22 private colleges in attendance, this year’s semifinalists included: High Point University, Salem College, Belmont Abbey College and North Carolina Wesleyan University. The competition was held at the North Carolina Legislative Complex in Raleigh on February 21 and 22. The judge’s panel was composed of 60 corporate, nonprofit, legislative and community leaders.

North Carolina Wesleyan’s ethics team is led by Boluwatife Johnson, Chanel Patterson as Ethical Theory Lead. The researchers for the team include James Cheazar, Richard “RJ” Smalls, Catherine Leake and Grace deMontesquiou. Drs. Jarrod Kelly and Sherry Holland serve as faculty coordinators. With some members graduating, the team hopes to recruit new members and return next year for competition.

Faculty coordinator, Jarrod Kelly, congratulates the team, “We received many positive comments from judges, team coordinators and spectators. Our team was complimented most on their presentations,” he says. “The team really had their opening statement down to a science and it was extraordinarily impressive to observe. The team stole the spotlight with their poise, knowledge and passion.” The team had a record of 4-0 in regular level matches and had been preparing for the competition since August 2019.

Wilson Community College and North Carolina Wesleyan University Partner to Enhance College Transfer


WILSON — Wilson Community College (WCC) and North Carolina Wesleyan University (NCWC) signed a Memorandum of Understanding and University Partnership Agreement on Monday, February 24, that enables students to continue their education after earning a two-year degree. The agreement gives WCC students with Associate in Arts (AA), Associate in Science (AS), and Associate in Applied Science (AAS) degrees access to the Wesleyan Works program, which includes pre-admission advising, transfer credits, and a clear definition of the transfer of courses from WCC to NCWC. 

(L-R): Dr. Evan Duff, President of NC Wesleyan University,
Tim Wright, President of Wilson Community College

Wesleyan Works is a transfer program designed for community college students who plan to continue their education at NCWC. The program guarantees admission to NCWC for WCC’s AA, AS, and AAS graduates. WCC students who transfer under this agreement are automatically eligible for Wesleyan Works. Students will have access to academic advising and financial aid counseling through NCWC. 

WCC students who graduate and transfer under this agreement can select any of NCWC’s traditional programs of study or may enroll in NCWC’s Adult and Professional Studies programs, utilizing the advantages of the Wesleyan Works program. For example, AAS graduates may transfer up to 75 credit hours to NCWC. 

WCC Vice President for Academic Affairs Mr. Rob Holsten shared, “We are excited to continue and expand our partnership with North Carolina Wesleyan University to offer more options for students to continue their studies after completing their two-year degree here at Wilson Community College. This type of partnership furthers the College’s mission to help students reach their educational goals, and adds to existing opportunities for transferable degrees.” 

WCC, NC Wesleyan Sign Transfer Agreement


GOLDSBORO, NC – Wayne Community College and North Carolina Wesleyan University have renewed their commitment to seamless transfer between the two schools.

Dr. Thomas A. Walker Jr., president of WCC, and Dr. Evan D. Duff, interim president of NC Wesleyan, signed an agreement for “Wesleyan Works,” a transfer program for community college students who plan to continue their education at NC Wesleyan.

Students who participate in Wesleyan Works are guaranteed acceptance into NC Wesleyan once they earn an Associate in Arts, Associate in Science, or other Associate in Applied Science degree from WCC and their WCC courses will transfer seamlessly into comparable bachelor’s degree programs at NCWC.

While they are enrolled in WCC, Wesleyan Works participants will have access to academic advising and financial aid counseling from both institutions and can attend events on both the WCC campus and the NCWC main campus in Rocky Mount.

“My first objective when I came to Wesleyan was to build partnerships to provide access to a bachelor’s degree to as many NC community college graduates as possible,” said Dr. Duff. “My goal is to be the best transfer partner.”

Dr. Walker agreed that such alliances enhance WCC’s programs by providing smooth transitions into further educational opportunities. “This program sets up our students to not only succeed here but also when they get to NC Wesleyan,” said Dr. Walker. “We are constantly striving to improve the path that takes our students to advanced educational options and better stations in life.”

Officials at both colleges view the agreement as a win-win situation for the schools and their respective students. The ability to pursue a four-year degree upon completion of an associate degree is attractive to WCC students and NC Wesleyan has the opportunity to grow its enrollment with a pool of students who have proven that they have the academic skills to succeed in an institution of higher education.

For more information, potential participants can contact Kacee Ingram, director of the WCC College Transfer Advising Center, at 919-739-6755 or klingram@waynecc.edu.

About Wayne Community College
Wayne Community College is a public, learning-centered institution with an open-door admission policy located in Goldsboro, N.C. As it works to develop a highly skilled and competitive workforce, the college serves 11,000 individuals annually as well as businesses, industry, and community organizations with high quality, affordable, accessible learning opportunities, including more than 140 college credit programs. WCC’s mission is to meet the educational, training, and cultural needs of the communities it serves.

North Carolina Wesleyan, Forsyth Technical Community College Sign New Transfer Partnership Agreement


A new transfer partnership agreement will create a streamlined path for Forsyth Technical Community College graduates to pursue a bachelor’s degree from North Carolina Wesleyan.

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. (January 8, 2020) –-During a formal signing event on Wednesday, January 8, North Carolina Wesleyan University announced a new agreement with Forsyth Technical Community College (Forsyth Tech) to facilitate degree completion and student success by improving access to undergraduate educational resources, college facilities and support systems.

“Forsyth Tech is thrilled to collaborate with NC Wesleyan in this agreement,” said President of Forsyth Tech Dr. Janet N. Spriggs. “Having this strategic alliance will offer tremendous benefits to our students and to the community in demonstrating how higher education works together to improve student completion and success.” 

In partnership, NC Wesleyan and Forsyth Tech will enhance and expand the educational opportunities for Forsyth Tech’s Associate in Science specifically in Business Administration and Criminal Justice programs. NC Wesleyan will maintain a full-time Coordinator of Transfer Admission at one of the Forsyth Tech campus sites.

“NCWC has a long history of partnering with NC Community Colleges and we are excited to add FT to our list of partners,” said Interim President of NC Wesleyan Dr. Evan D. Duff. “It is collaborations like this that enable students to attain their bachelor’s or master’s degree without having to leave their family or job.”

FT has launched five new co-admission partnerships over the last two years with Bellevue University, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical University, Salem College University of North Carolina – Greensboro and Winston-Salem State University, to improve student access to undergraduate and graduate education. The programs begin enrolling in fall 2019.

North Carolina Wesleyan University, a private institution affiliated with the United Methodist Church, prepares students for professional advancement, life-long learning and responsible participation in their communities. NC Wesleyan University provides a highly personalized education in a dynamic and challenging environment. With students from all over the United States and more than 40 different countries, NC Wesleyan is a small college with a big taste for cultural diversity. Follow NCWC on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Instagram.

About Forsyth Tech
Forsyth Technical Community College is a catalyst for equitable economic mobility, empowering lives and transforming communities. The college offers associate degrees, diplomas, and certificates in over 200 programs of study, including programs that promote personal and professional development through non-credit courses and seminars, as well as customized training for business and industry. Forsyth Tech serves more than 35,000 students with approximately 1,500 full and part-time faculty and staff. For additional information, visit forsythtech.edu and follow on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn  and Instagram.

Bishops Bounce Back After Summer Storm


ROCKY MOUNT, NORTH CAROLINA On June 20, 2019, a sudden and severe storm hit NC Wesleyan University causing damage to the Vernon T. Bradley Sports Complex. It was later confirmed by the National Weather Service that the damage was caused by straight-line winds. The College was fortunate that the damage was isolated to the sports fields and that no person or building was harmed. Now, the College is bouncing back and rebuilding better than ever.

The storm resulted in approximately $250,000 of damages, including significant destruction to Edge softball field, the most prevalent being downed fencing, damaged bleachers, a torn down scoreboard and the home field dugout was destroyed. Other areas of campus, such as the Bauer baseball field and Vernon T. Bradley practice football field, also sustained fence damage. Approximately ninety-two trees were broken off or down in the woods bordering Thomas A. Betts Parkway. That day, many from the Wesleyan family quickly poured in and assisted in removing debris, gathering equipment and collecting field maintenance gear from the damaged softball storage house adjacent to the field. 

A substantial portion of the damage was covered by insurance and since then, Wesleyan has been busy rebuilding what was lost and improving what was damaged. This includes a new and improved softball dugout, a new fence around the Bauer Baseball Field and a new softball scoreboard.

“The softball facility sustained significant damage to the scoreboard, dugout, storage shed and fencing during the June storm. We currently have new fencing and a new dugout with a storage area and bathrooms. Our new scoreboard will be going up in the next couple of weeks,” stated Head Softball Coach, John Brackett. “The teamwork that was displayed that day was just as stunning as the storm itself.  I am truly thankful for all of those that pitched in to help that day, as well as those that have been instrumental in the rebuilding process.” Wesleyan was able to show off some of these campus improvements during their Homecoming Weekend on October 12. Students, faculty, staff, alumni and friends of the College came together for a weekend full of festivities, including their first-ever on-campus football game. As final repairs take shape, the College looks forward to the New Year and utilizing these improvements in the spring.